Healthcare News & Insights

Renée Cocchi

Renée CocchiRenée Cocchi, Editor of HealthcareBusinessTech, has been writing for the medical and scientific community for 23 years. She got her Master’s degree in Scientific and Technical Communications from Drexel University, and since then she’s been written extensively for physical therapists, fitness industry experts, surgeons, primary care physicians, office managers, coders and hospital executives.
Renee joined Progressive Business Publications (the parent company of HealthcareBusinessTech) 11 years ago to research and launch a group of coding and reimbursement newsletters focused on helping primary care physicians get their financial just desserts from insurance companies and the government. In addition to managing the newsletters, Renee also manages a safety newsletter and two nonprofit newsletters, so she is well verse in the business world.
Renee also writes and manages white papers on a variety of topics for top-level business executives.
Find Renee on Google+


Walmart announces big benefit changes in 2020: What this means for hospitals

Retail giant Walmart may draw in customers looking for value, but employees are about to see a jump in the value of their benefits in 2020 as the company steps up to lead corporate healthcare innovation. And its offerings may make it a major competitor for hospitals and health systems.

Data breaches: Researchers advocate for sharing what, not just how much, is leaked

Researchers are urging hospitals to not just tally the number of patients exposed in the event of a data breach, but reveal the types of data exposed to both better understand consequences and create better security practices. 

Managed care: High-cost patients have other needs not being met

Social determinants of health are interfering with the efficiency and cost savings of managed care, according to a government watchdog’s report. 

First information-blocking fine levied on Florida hospital

A Florida hospital was hit this month with the first fine by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) for information blocking after it took too long to fulfill a patient’s record request. 

Instead of saving them, one man ruined 18 at-risk rural hospitals

Rural, for-profit hospitals are closing at an alarming rate — in part because of the combination of lower incomes and fewer insured people, which makes it difficult for at-risk hospitals to cover their fixed costs. 

Which doctors at your facility have the highest risk of being sued?

Guess what two medical specialties are the most likely to be sued for medical malpractice? If you said OB-GYNs, you got one correct. Here’s a hint about the second group: You’d be hard pressed to find a hospital without them. 

Leadership rounds: Create a ‘patient safety first’ culture

Doctors aren’t the only people who should be making rounds at your facility. Hospital executives need to get out from behind their desks and make their own patient safety “leadership rounds.” 

Does your hospital’s website need a facelift?

People who come to your hospital’s website are typically in a hurry and may not be in the best mood. Since this is your chance to make a great first impression, you don’t want to screw it up. And if your hospital’s website hasn’t been updated in the past few years, there’s a very good […] [MORE]

ECRI’s top 10 patient safety concerns

Keeping patients safe and happy is a priority for all hospitals. And a big part of that entails watching out for issues that may endanger patients. That’s why ECRI Institute created its list of the Top 10 Patient Safety Concerns for Healthcare Organizations 2017. 

Make zero ‘never events’ your hospital’s goal

“Never events” received their name because they’re serious adverse events that should never happen – they’re 100% preventable. Problem is, they do happen and with alarming frequency. And despite mandatory reporting, only about half the states comply, and what they report varies due to flawed measurement processes. So how can hospitals improve?

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