Healthcare News & Insights

Renée Cocchi

Renée CocchiRenée Cocchi, Editor of HealthcareBusinessTech, has been writing for the medical and scientific community for 23 years. She got her Master’s degree in Scientific and Technical Communications from Drexel University, and since then she’s been written extensively for physical therapists, fitness industry experts, surgeons, primary care physicians, office managers, coders and hospital executives.
Renee joined Progressive Business Publications (the parent company of HealthcareBusinessTech) 11 years ago to research and launch a group of coding and reimbursement newsletters focused on helping primary care physicians get their financial just desserts from insurance companies and the government. In addition to managing the newsletters, Renee also manages a safety newsletter and two nonprofit newsletters, so she is well verse in the business world.
Renee also writes and manages white papers on a variety of topics for top-level business executives.
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More doctors are needed to treat the elderly

Doctors who specialize in treating the elderly are in short supply. And this shortage is expected to get worse as 70 million baby boomers turn 65 by 2030. 

Are get-well gifts a hazard to your patients’ health?

Visitors are good for your patients. Patients’ spirits are lifted by seeing familiar faces, and receiving get-well gifts and comfort items from home. But some hospitals see visitors as just another possible source of contamination to battle – spreading germs and bringing in allergens such as flowers, latex balloons and stuffed animals. That’s why some facilities are […] [MORE]

Risky texting: 3 reasons you shouldn’t text ePHI

Texting may be convenient, but when it comes to transferring healthcare information, it can be full of costly risks. In this guest post, Erik Kangas, founder of an Internet services company dedicated to secure web and email hosting, gives reasons why you shouldn’t text ePHI and what you can do to mitigate the risks.

Study: Patients with vision loss have longer stays, higher readmission rate

There’s yet another group of patients you can help get better faster and keep from being readmitted by focusing on their specific need – patients with vision loss. At least that’s what a new study found. 

Fraud or compliance issue? Supreme Court hears debate on ‘implied certification’

A case being heard by the Supreme Court could have far reaching consequences when it comes to healthcare fraud. 

Study shows self-administered IV antibiotics reduce hospital stays

A recent study shed light on a new treatment process that could help hospitals lower their readmissions rates, save millions of dollars and empower patients to take an active role in their care. 

Texas hospitals develop rapid detection Zika virus test

Texas Children’s Hospital and Houston Methodist Hospital have developed the country’s first hospital-based rapid detection test for the Zika virus, which was declared by the World Health Organization (WHO) a Public Health Emergency of International Concern on Feb. 1, 2016. 

Keep ED patients safe: Common information system errors

Emergency department information systems (EDIS) provide much-needed help, such as legible documentation, retrieval of past patient information and adherence to best practices. But just like with anything else, with the positives come the negatives. 

Does higher use of post-acute care lead to higher readmission rates?

Could how often a hospital uses post-acute care affect its readmission rates? According to a new study the answer is yes, and it’s not for the better. 

New study shows the majority of patients don’t understand their discharge summaries

Hospitals across the U.S. are doing everything they can to reduce readmissions. A new study offers facilities one more factor to look at when it comes to reducing readmissions – discharge summaries.